03 7 / 2014

My version of Italian (no mayo) Potato Salad: boiled potatoes, roasted red peppers, generous amounts of extra virgin olive oil and minced garlic to coat, seasoned with salt and pepper.

My version of Italian (no mayo) Potato Salad: boiled potatoes, roasted red peppers, generous amounts of extra virgin olive oil and minced garlic to coat, seasoned with salt and pepper.

13 4 / 2014

onefitmodel:

BEEN WAITING FOR THIS FOR SO LONG

(Source: symphonyofawesomeness, via ratfink0521)

26 3 / 2014

Asian Chopped Salad with Creamy Tahini Dressing:

  • 2 tbsp tahini
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp agave nectar 
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Whisk to combine. Makes approx 1/2 cup. 

This pre-packaged Dole chopped salad blend has kale, green and red cabbage, broccoli, carrots and snap peas. The agave and sesame seeds are my additions to the salad dressing recipe on the back of the package. I would add some scallions and julienned cucumber next time. 

27 1 / 2014

Brown Rice, Lentil and Spinach Soup

Brown Rice, Lentil and Spinach Soup

23 12 / 2013

Homemade marshmallows from the recipe in America’s Test Kitchen DIY Cookbook. The mixer does most of the work in this recipe. In about30 minutes you’ve got your mixture laid out and ready to set overnight. In the morning you just need to dust and cut into pieces.

29 10 / 2013

Garam Masala Toasted Pumpkin Seed Recipe: 
Toss 2 cups of cleaned, raw pumpkin seeds with a tablespoon garam masala, dash of cayenne pepper and teaspoon of kosher salt. Add a scant tbsp coconut oil and stir to coat. Spread seeds on parchment paper lined pan and toast at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. Toss seeds halfway through to toast evenly.</p>

Substitutions: curry powder for garam masala, ghee for coconut oil

Garam Masala Toasted Pumpkin Seed Recipe:
Toss 2 cups of cleaned, raw pumpkin seeds with a tablespoon garam masala, dash of cayenne pepper and teaspoon of kosher salt. Add a scant tbsp coconut oil and stir to coat. Spread seeds on parchment paper lined pan and toast at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. Toss seeds halfway through to toast evenly.</p>

Substitutions: curry powder for garam masala, ghee for coconut oil

09 10 / 2013

Turkey phô

I’ve posted about this recipe before, but this is by request. It’s not traditional beef phô, but it’s a great substitute.

If you don’t have a whole turkey, roasted turkey wings and legs make for a really flavorful broth as well and are generally inexpensive as well. Alternately you can make this same recipe with beef. Cover carrot, a quartered yellow onion, a few cilantro stems, about an inch of ginger cut into slices, roasted turkey meat (or beef soup bone or oxtail) and 2 star anise (available in most Asian markets) with cold water and bring to a boil in a large pot. I like to let the broth boil for at least 2-3 hours, skimming any impurities as it cooks. The noodles need to be softened by soaking in cool water in a large bowl about an hour or more before you’re ready to cook them. Once the broth has become more opaque and taken on some color you can add salt to taste and begin to prepare individual bowls. Each portion of phô is prepared individually. Take a handful of noodles and submerge them in the simmering broth with a strainer. Then fill a bowl of noodles with cooked meat, top with broth and add your condiments. We always include the southeast Asian trifecta (sweet, salty and sour) of hoisin sauce, fish sauce and lime, as well as Sriracha, fresh basil, mint, bean sprouts, fresh hot peppers, thinly sliced onion and tomato. Part of the fun is making each bowl to taste.

*If you’re making this with beef, you’ll need to add thinly sliced raw meat to the strainer after you’ve cooked and removed the noodles to the bowl. Swirl meat slices around for a minute in the boiling broth until rare, remove to bowl and cover meat and noodles with broth to serve. I’ll often use eye of round or London broil, sometimes partially frozen to facilitate slicing it paper thin. You can also just pour the piping hot broth over the sliced meat in your bowl instead of cooking it in the strainer. Again, this is done to individual taste.

09 10 / 2013

Hungry Kichen turned 2 today!
I’ll be celebrating by finally posting my phô recipe.

Hungry Kichen turned 2 today!

I’ll be celebrating by finally posting my phô recipe.

(Source: assets)

28 9 / 2013

helms-deep:

Pizza-ing @ Helm’s Deep 101

Someone asked me last week in a message (that I can now not find) how we do our pizzas at home. These are just some basic rules of thumb that we’ve used to make Pizza Night @ Helm’s Deep© a success.

  1. A super-hot oven. Crank it up as high as it will go. You’re not gonna get a home oven up to the temps that a large pizzerea can (1000-1500 degrees), but most will go up to at least 500.
  2. Place oven rack on its highest setting and preheat your pizza stone when you turn on your oven. If you don’t have a pizza stone, I strongly recommend you get one. This also helps mimic the large pizza ovens they use in restaurants.
  3. Get yourself a pizza peel and flour it well. It makes putting the pizza in and taking it out so much easier. We picked ours up on Amazon.
  4. Don’t weigh it down too much with toppings, sauce, and cheese. Our pies come out at about 14” (one Fassbender if that’s how you measure things), and we put 1/2 cup sauce, 1 cup cheese, and then I try and distribute the toppings as evenly as possible. I then usually shred about 1/8-1/4 cup of Romano or Parmesan cheese on the top before throwing it in the oven. If I’m using tomatoes, I’ll wait until the pizza has about 5 minutes left before adding them. And, if I’m adding basil, I always sprinkle it on immediately after the pizza has come out.
  5. Use bread flour. Just trust me on this. The consistency and flavor of your dough will be so much better if you do.

Those are just a few of the main things we make sure to follow every week. To whomever sent the message to me, hope this helps! Feel free to ask any other questions you have.

Great pizza 101 from a pro.

15 8 / 2013

From flank steak to jerky…it’s magical. I used the America’s Test Kitchen D.I.Y. Cookbook recipe with some variations to the seasoning mix based on what was available in my pantry. I love the smokey and spicy results. I think this would make an awesome food gift too, but for now it will make for great beach snacks.